My mind is a battlefield.

21. Female. I'm a proud inhabitant of New Orleans, although raised in the Northern Great Lakes area. I enjoy intelligent conversations.
Reblogged from reviewingtheceltics  11 notes
Are there any Celtic gods of travel?
Anonymous

reviewingtheceltics:

Here’s my take on this. First of all, in terms of Gaelic deities, there wouldn’t say anywhere in the texts, “so-and-so is the god of travel,” because that’s not the way it works with Celtic myth. So what we’re left with is deciding associations based on what they do in the myths. In that light, still only insofar as Gaelic gods go, your best bet for this sort of thing would be an animistic deity; in this case, specifically, you’d be looking for an animistic deity of a road or something of that nature. Here’s the problem with that: people build roads, they don’t form naturally, and therefore there can’t be legends about them forming supernaturally. All of the legends we have about animistic deities—Boann, Sionann, Aine; all of them created in some way the landmark that they are said to be the goddess of.

I’m not sure if things are different for Brythonic deities, but I rather doubt it. Your best bet, I think, would be a continental Celtic deity, because, quite frankly, travel is somewhat more of a big deal when you’re not on a tiny little island.

The thing about that is that, while there are local gods of specific roads, there does not seem to be any singular travel deity who rises to the top. This is due to the vast richness of Gaulish cultures combined with the overbearing influence of the Romans. Many, many Gaulish deities were identified with Mercury, who is the Roman god of roads and travel, amongst other things. However, because he is the god of many other things, it’s not always clear why one particular local Gaulish god is identified with him. In a lot of cases the Romans just went, “aww, look Gaius, they’ve got a little Mercury cult! aren’t they cute?” “They sure are, Gaius.” Even if you did fish out one or two (invariably Latinized) names that are definitely road-gods, all you would have would be the name. I can give you one right now that I dug up, Cimiacinus, but I’ll be damned if you can find any information on him.

Here is the inscription that he is known by, from Ludenhausen: DEO MERCVRIO CIMIACINO ARAM TVRARIAM M(ARCVS) PATERNIVS VITALIS QVI AEDEM FECIT ET SIGNVM POSVIT V(OTVM) S(OLVIT) L(IBENS) L(AETVS) M(ERITO) DEDICAT III KAL(ENDAS) OCTOBR(ES) GENTIANO ET BASSO CO(N)S(VLIBVS). This doesn’t say anything interesting, it essentially just reads, “Marcus Paternius (some Roman dude) made this temple…” on a certain date, etc. etc., “for the god Mercury Cimiacinus.” Aram is altar, turariam could be something to do with incense, but I dunno. There’s no information.

TL;DR Yes, there were many, but they are all local Gaulish deities and therefore there is little useful information on them.

— Korrigan

Reblogged from finsterforst  212 notes

The Northmen do not think it in keeping with the divine majesty to confine gods within walls or portray them in the likeness of any human countenance. Their holy places are woods and groves, and they apply the names of deities to that hidden presence which is seen only by the eye of reverence. By Tacitus, 1st century AD (via hjartastyrkur)

Reblogged from nicstoirm  37 notes

Whether one is talking about universalist heathen sects (which are inclusive by charter), or folkish sects attempting to recreate specific tribalisms with descendants of specific tribes, the concepts of race and race purity just do not fit in heathen religion and mythology. The idea of race is a modern concept.

The ancient heathens were tribal peoples. The Saxons and the Celts did not think of themselves as the same people. They were different tribes with different languages and different gods. They were “other” to each other, and yet, they also intermarried. Heathens of the ancient world traded, raided, married, and had sex with pretty much any group of people they encountered. They had no concept of racial purity. [Emphasis added]

By

Erin Lale, in "Asgard as a Multi-Racial Society" at Eternal Haunted Summer

Thank you, Erin Lale.

The problem of “Why don’t you worship your own gods?” turning up among Pagans of color has long annoyed me*+. The idea of racial or genetic purity as some sort of magical link really, really sets my teeth on edge.

A tribal group may accept whomever it chooses— and the more diverse its selections, the better off it is. Most importantly, the gods may appear to whomever they choose.

*Out of politeness, I won’t even get to the sloppy, poorly-researched “borrowing” of other cultural traditions or gods that tends to happen among the very same people.

+Disclaimer: I’m white.

(via nicstoirm)

Reblogged from iopanosiris  13 notes
iopanosiris:

Sumerian Grail of Lagash - ritual cup. DRAGON CUP OF KING GUDEA Ancient Sumerian Votive Chalice.   “The Tree of Life had also been linked with the serpent or dragon (winged serpent) for over 1,000 years before Genesis was written. In 2025 BC the cup of the Sumerian King Gudea of Lagash (see Chapter 5, Fig. 22) showed two winged dragons holding back a pair of opening doors to reveal a caduceus of uniting snakes, the incarnation of the god Ningizzida, one of the names given to the consort of the mother goddess, to whom the cup is inscribed: ‘Lord of the Tree of Truth’.”

iopanosiris:

Sumerian Grail of Lagash - ritual cup. DRAGON CUP OF KING GUDEA Ancient Sumerian Votive Chalice. 
  “The Tree of Life had also been linked with the serpent or dragon (winged serpent) for over 1,000 years before Genesis was written. In 2025 BC the cup of the Sumerian King Gudea of Lagash (see Chapter 5, Fig. 22) showed two winged dragons holding back a pair of opening doors to reveal a caduceus of uniting snakes, the incarnation of the god Ningizzida, one of the names given to the consort of the mother goddess, to whom the cup is inscribed: ‘Lord of the Tree of Truth’.”