My mind is a battlefield.

21. Female. I'm a proud inhabitant of New Orleans, although raised in the Northern Great Lakes area. I enjoy intelligent conversations.
Reblogged from scarletimprint  24 notes

But the wolves do not stop running. There is a hunger which cannot be sated. The wolf transgresses the boundary of the village but lives in the wild among its own kind. (…) We mediate between the demands of these worlds and as the balance shifts, so too must we. Our survival depends on it. By Peter Grey. Apocalyptic Witchcraft. (via johnnynightshift)

Reblogged from bodaciousbanshee  1 note

The Song of the Siren of the Eschaton (soon to be put to music)

bodaciousbanshee:

I was once afraid of my Fate

It’s such a dark destiny

But now I feel I cannot wait

To destroy Humanity 

..

My Brother taught a way of Light

But how did you repay Him?

I come now Swift on the Winds of Night

It’s time to Avenge my Kin

..

I bring the Brimstone that you Preach

The Holy Fire from the Sky

Listen to the Gospel I teach

Risen Pheonix Will not Die

..

Justice, by the edge of my Scythe

I have come to Reap your souls

Daughter Ma’at, come to Judge all Life

Your hard hearts are Mine to hold

..

I am my own Mother

I am my own Sister

I am risen Daughter

I shall Slay your Father

..

I am Incarnate

I am Goddess of Fate

..

Behold me now, once called a Whore

See me, the Queen of Heaven

Returned from Night’s Plutonian Shore

BABYLON, the Star of Seven

..

(c) bodaciousbansee.tumblr.com 2014

Reblogged from talysia  43,768 notes

hatzigsut:

very chilling topic on twitter right now. 

i have my own reasons for #WhyIStayed, and looking through this hashtag, i can see so many women and men who were lost, just as i was.

i stayed because it was the first time i felt important to anyone. he “loved” me. when he said he would die if i left him, i thought it passionate. when he started showing up unannounced at my house, because my friends told him my brother’s friends were over, i thought the jealousy was endearing.

then he tried to kill himself when i left town for two days. he was convinced that i would find someone else, in a town where i knew no one. i came back home, and promised i would never leave.

the manipulation and emotional abuse became physical—but only once. he slammed me against a wall after i made a joke about dumping him once i started college. i hid the bruises from my family, for weeks. that was the moment i decided to get out, no matter what happened. for some people, it only takes one time. others need more than one. and some people never make it out alive.

it is not always easy to “just leave.” it is a blessing if you are able to leave, with no consequences.

Reblogged from nihilistic-void  1,540 notes
mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.
Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισινἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.
And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariotas she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.
Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.
You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.

mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.

Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισιν
ἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,
κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.

And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariot
as she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,
pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.

Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.

You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.